Flashcards on Glasgow Coma Scale

Click on the flashcard to see the answer


What is the Glasgow Coma Scale used for?

The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is used to assess the level of consciousness of a patient.

What does the Glasgow Coma Scale measure?

The Glasgow Coma Scale measures three aspects of a patient's consciousness: eye-opening response, verbal response, and motor response.

How is the Glasgow Coma Scale scored?

Patients are scored on a scale of 3 to 15 based on their response in the three categories: eye-opening response, verbal response, and motor response.

What is the maximum Glasgow Coma Scale score a patient can receive?

The maximum Glasgow Coma Scale score is 15.

What does a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3 indicate?

A Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3 indicates that the patient is in a deep coma and is completely unresponsive to stimuli.

What is the minimum Glasgow Coma Scale score a patient can receive?

The minimum Glasgow Coma Scale score a patient can receive is 3.

What does a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 indicate?

A Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 indicates that the patient is in a state of unconsciousness, but can respond to painful stimuli.

What does a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15 indicate?

A Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15 indicates that the patient is fully conscious and aware of their surroundings.

What is the difference between the eye-opening response, verbal response, and motor response categories of the Glasgow Coma Scale?

The eye-opening response category measures the patient's ability to open their eyes in response to a stimulus, the verbal response category measures the patient's ability to speak or make sounds in response to a stimulus, and the motor response category measures the patient's ability to move their limbs or respond to a stimulus by moving their limbs.

What is a common use for the Glasgow Coma Scale in emergency medicine?

The Glasgow Coma Scale is commonly used to assess patients with head injuries and to monitor their level of consciousness over time.

What are the three tiers of the Glasgow Coma Scale?

The three tiers of the Glasgow Coma Scale are mild brain injury (13-15), moderate brain injury (9-12), and severe brain injury (less than or equal to 8).

What are some limitations of the Glasgow Coma Scale?

Some limitations of the Glasgow Coma Scale include the fact that it does not take into account other aspects of brain function, such as cognitive or emotional function, and that it can be affected by factors such as sedation, intubation, and paralysis.

Who developed the Glasgow Coma Scale?

The Glasgow Coma Scale was developed by Graham Teasdale and Bryan J. Jennett in 1974.

What is the purpose of the Glasgow Coma Scale?

The purpose of the Glasgow Coma Scale is to provide a simple, objective way to assess the consciousness of a patient and to track their progress over time.

How long has the Glasgow Coma Scale been in use?

The Glasgow Coma Scale has been in use for over 45 years.

What is the Glasgow Coma Scale used for?

The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is used to assess the level of consciousness of a patient.

What does the Glasgow Coma Scale measure?

The Glasgow Coma Scale measures three aspects of a patient's consciousness: eye-opening response, verbal response, and motor response.

How is the Glasgow Coma Scale scored?

Patients are scored on a scale of 3 to 15 based on their response in the three categories: eye-opening response, verbal response, and motor response.

What is the maximum Glasgow Coma Scale score a patient can receive?

The maximum Glasgow Coma Scale score is 15.

What does a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3 indicate?

A Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3 indicates that the patient is in a deep coma and is completely unresponsive to stimuli.

What is the minimum Glasgow Coma Scale score a patient can receive?

The minimum Glasgow Coma Scale score a patient can receive is 3.

What does a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 indicate?

A Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 indicates that the patient is in a state of unconsciousness, but can respond to painful stimuli.

What does a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15 indicate?

A Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15 indicates that the patient is fully conscious and aware of their surroundings.

What is the difference between the eye-opening response, verbal response, and motor response categories of the Glasgow Coma Scale?

The eye-opening response category measures the patient's ability to open their eyes in response to a stimulus, the verbal response category measures the patient's ability to speak or make sounds in response to a stimulus, and the motor response category measures the patient's ability to move their limbs or respond to a stimulus by moving their limbs.

What is a common use for the Glasgow Coma Scale in emergency medicine?

The Glasgow Coma Scale is commonly used to assess patients with head injuries and to monitor their level of consciousness over time.

What are the three tiers of the Glasgow Coma Scale?

The three tiers of the Glasgow Coma Scale are mild brain injury (13-15), moderate brain injury (9-12), and severe brain injury (less than or equal to 8).

What are some limitations of the Glasgow Coma Scale?

Some limitations of the Glasgow Coma Scale include the fact that it does not take into account other aspects of brain function, such as cognitive or emotional function, and that it can be affected by factors such as sedation, intubation, and paralysis.

Who developed the Glasgow Coma Scale?

The Glasgow Coma Scale was developed by Graham Teasdale and Bryan J. Jennett in 1974.

What is the purpose of the Glasgow Coma Scale?

The purpose of the Glasgow Coma Scale is to provide a simple, objective way to assess the consciousness of a patient and to track their progress over time.

How long has the Glasgow Coma Scale been in use?

The Glasgow Coma Scale has been in use for over 45 years.

Share


Login to Save


Share



Login to Save


Explore Other Decks


Made for Grade 7

L'Illuminismo


View Deck
Made for Grade 8

Ivan Franko - Ukrainian Literary Phenomenon


View Deck
Made for Grade 9

Computer Components


View Deck

Explore More