Flashcards on Magnetic Effects of Electric Current

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What is the magnetic effect of an electric current?

The magnetic effect of an electric current is the creation of a magnetic field around the conductor through which the current is passing.

What are the two ways in which a magnetic field is produced around a current-carrying conductor?

The two ways in which a magnetic field is produced around a current-carrying conductor are the right-hand thumb rule and the solenoid rule.

State Ampere's swimming rule.

Ampere's swimming rule states that if you swim with the direction of conventional current, your left hand will point towards the north.

What is the direction of the magnetic field produced by a straight current-carrying conductor?

The magnetic field produced by a straight current-carrying conductor follows the right-hand thumb rule, where the thumb points in the direction of the current and the curled fingers determine the direction of the magnetic field lines.

Explain the solenoid rule.

The solenoid rule states that if you grip a solenoid with your right hand, such that the fingers are wrapped around it in the direction of the current, then the thumb points in the direction of the magnetic field inside the solenoid.

What is the difference between a solenoid and a bar magnet?

A solenoid is a long coil of wire, while a bar magnet is a permanent magnet. Additionally, the magnetic field inside a solenoid is uniform and can be turned on and off by controlling the current, whereas a bar magnet has a non-uniform magnetic field and is always magnetized.

What is the purpose of a galvanometer?

A galvanometer is used to detect and measure small electric currents. It works based on the principle of the magnetic effect of electric current.

Explain the working principle of an electric motor.

An electric motor works on the principle that a current-carrying conductor placed in a magnetic field experiences a force. This force causes the conductor to move, resulting in the rotation of the motor.

What is electromagnetic induction?

Electromagnetic induction is the process of generating an electromotive force (emf) or voltage in a conductor when the magnetic field around it changes.

State Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction.

Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction states that the magnitude of the induced electromotive force (emf) is proportional to the rate of change of magnetic flux through a coil of wire.

What is the application of electromagnetic induction?

Electromagnetic induction finds applications in various devices such as transformers, electric generators, and induction cooktops.

Explain the working of a transformer.

A transformer works on the principle of electromagnetic induction. It consists of two coils, a primary coil and a secondary coil, which are magnetically coupled. The alternating current in the primary coil creates a changing magnetic field, which induces an alternating current in the secondary coil.

What is magnetic flux?

Magnetic flux is a measure of the total magnetic field passing through a given area. It depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the area perpendicular to the field.

Define the unit of magnetic field strength.

The unit of magnetic field strength is tesla (T), named after Nikola Tesla.

Explain the phenomenon of magnetic deflection.

Magnetic deflection refers to the deviation or bending of a charged particle's path due to the magnetic field. This phenomenon is used in devices like cathode ray tubes (CRTs) and particle accelerators.

What is the magnetic effect of an electric current?

The magnetic effect of an electric current is the creation of a magnetic field around the conductor through which the current is passing.

What are the two ways in which a magnetic field is produced around a current-carrying conductor?

The two ways in which a magnetic field is produced around a current-carrying conductor are the right-hand thumb rule and the solenoid rule.

State Ampere's swimming rule.

Ampere's swimming rule states that if you swim with the direction of conventional current, your left hand will point towards the north.

What is the direction of the magnetic field produced by a straight current-carrying conductor?

The magnetic field produced by a straight current-carrying conductor follows the right-hand thumb rule, where the thumb points in the direction of the current and the curled fingers determine the direction of the magnetic field lines.

Explain the solenoid rule.

The solenoid rule states that if you grip a solenoid with your right hand, such that the fingers are wrapped around it in the direction of the current, then the thumb points in the direction of the magnetic field inside the solenoid.

What is the difference between a solenoid and a bar magnet?

A solenoid is a long coil of wire, while a bar magnet is a permanent magnet. Additionally, the magnetic field inside a solenoid is uniform and can be turned on and off by controlling the current, whereas a bar magnet has a non-uniform magnetic field and is always magnetized.

What is the purpose of a galvanometer?

A galvanometer is used to detect and measure small electric currents. It works based on the principle of the magnetic effect of electric current.

Explain the working principle of an electric motor.

An electric motor works on the principle that a current-carrying conductor placed in a magnetic field experiences a force. This force causes the conductor to move, resulting in the rotation of the motor.

What is electromagnetic induction?

Electromagnetic induction is the process of generating an electromotive force (emf) or voltage in a conductor when the magnetic field around it changes.

State Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction.

Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction states that the magnitude of the induced electromotive force (emf) is proportional to the rate of change of magnetic flux through a coil of wire.

What is the application of electromagnetic induction?

Electromagnetic induction finds applications in various devices such as transformers, electric generators, and induction cooktops.

Explain the working of a transformer.

A transformer works on the principle of electromagnetic induction. It consists of two coils, a primary coil and a secondary coil, which are magnetically coupled. The alternating current in the primary coil creates a changing magnetic field, which induces an alternating current in the secondary coil.

What is magnetic flux?

Magnetic flux is a measure of the total magnetic field passing through a given area. It depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the area perpendicular to the field.

Define the unit of magnetic field strength.

The unit of magnetic field strength is tesla (T), named after Nikola Tesla.

Explain the phenomenon of magnetic deflection.

Magnetic deflection refers to the deviation or bending of a charged particle's path due to the magnetic field. This phenomenon is used in devices like cathode ray tubes (CRTs) and particle accelerators.

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